OldTowns

Click on the targets next to each name to read histories and find links to more information on these towns.

Hunters Bissel Cedonia Turk Fruitland Egypt Miles Pitney Bottle Wellpinit Blue Creek  Camp Alyea AKA Wills Gerome Jerusalem DeTillion Bridge Deer Trail Germania Fort Spokane Pepoon Goldstake Laurier Dulwich Orient Bossburg Boyds Tie Camp Powell Napoleon Evans Godfrey Lake City Marcus East Marcus Marble Rockcut Ryan, AKA Williams Waterloo Palmer Siding Greenwood Saint Pauls Mission Harter North Basin Pleasant Valley Arzina Rice Daisy Maud Blue Point Swiss Valley Summit Valley Hungry Hollow Gifford Light Inchelium Echo Meyers Falls Rickey Warren Harvey Dunn Schmidt Spencer Old Kettle Falls Goodwin AKL Ward, St Regis Mis Ward (see also Goodwin) Chewelah Bingville Three Forks Colville Addy Wessendorf Lost Valley Wrights Valley Arden Park Rapids Middleport Old Colville Millville Fort Colville Crystal Falls Orin Blue Creek Waits Pinkney City Kane Velvet Fivemile Spirit Paradise Valley Smackout Camp Divine Place Peterson Clearing Paff Clearing Boundary Cummins, AKA Leadpoint Northport Stones Spur Little Dalles Aladdin Cronin Carrs Corner Little Sweden Cline Gray Empey Sch. Silver Point Ford Tumtum Denison Deer Park Wayside Clayton Loon Lake Keystone  Corners Fort Carlson Valley Dehlbone Loon Lake Park Granite Point Walkers Prarie Springdale Thetis AKA Siwash Squire City Spokane House


Hunters

Population 400. First settled in 1880, at Hunters creek falls on Columbia river. Central trading point for the settlers in Hunters. Harvey and Fruitland Valleys and the Colville and Spokane Indian reservations. Forty miles south of Kettle Falls, 40 miles north of Davenport, 30 miles west of Springdale, the nearest railroad point. Daily stage and mail to above places. Fare from Springdale, $3.00; same day from Spokane; from Kettle Falls or Davenport, $4.00, two days and night from Spokane. fifty-two miles by road from Colville, the county seat. Daily boat on Columbia. surrounding country noted for its high grade fruit, especially adapted to growing the perfect winter apple with the longest keeping qualities, The prize corn west of the Rocky Mountains grows here. Yielding from 40 to 60 bushels to the acre, Potatoes, 500 bushels not uncommon; alfalfa, clover and timothy give enormous crops. Climate is mild, even and without wind or damaging frosts. Abundance of firewood and pure running water. Many square miles of rich, moist loam requiring no irrigation, though plenty of available water for the arid benches along the river. Rich gold and silver mines in nearby mountains are worked extensivcly. The rough land provides a heavy growth of bunch grass for pasture, With transportation assured in the near future it will promptly take its place with Wenatchee and Yakima valleys, Grant Martin, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Hunters you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Hunters with pictures.


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Bissel

A postoffice on the Columbia river, first settled in 1893, 45 miles southwest of Colville, the county seat, 20 miles west of Addy, its shipping point and 8 miles north of Hunters, the nearest banking point. Clark's Lake is located in this vicinity, which will furnish water for irrigation. 'With the rich soil and fine climate, this will in the near future be one of the best fruit growing countries in the northwest.' Farmers Telephone service to all points. Stage daily to Meyers Falls, Kettle Falls and Spokane. Mail daily. Susan M. Nix, postmaster.
(from the Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Bissel you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Bissel with pictures. For current pictures from near Bissel you can visit the Bissel page on the River Routes Tour


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Cedonia

Population 23. A village postoffice first established in 1899, on the Columbia river, 45 miles southwest of Colville, the county seat, 4 miles south of Hunters,(actually it is 4 miles North of Hunters) the banking town, and 22 miles northeast (actually southwest) of Addy, its shipping point. Contains Union and Christian churches, and two stores. Stage daily, except Sunday, with mail to Meyers Falls and Davenport. Mrs. Agnes M. Turner, postmaster. (Corrections to orginal text in parenthesis)
For names of people in Cedonia you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Cedonia with pictures. For current pictures from near Cedonia you can visit the Cedonia page on the River Routes Tour

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Turk

The towns of Turk, Cedarville and Deer Trail were all http://crossroadsarchive.org/Maps/Oldtowns/Cedarville.htm

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Fruitland

Population 50 in town and 250 in surrounding country. A postoffice on the Davenport to Kettle Falls stage line, 42 miles south of Kettle Falls, 35 miles east of Springdale, 35 miles north of Davenport, on the N. P. Ry., its usual shipping and banking point, and 55 miles southwest of Colville, the county seat. It is surrounded by first class fruit farms and stock ranches. Has Adventist and Methodist churches. Daily stage to Kettle Falls, Davenport and Gerome. Tri-weekly stage to Springdale. Steamer Enterprise to Kettle Falls three times a week. Inland, Farmers' and Cedar Canyon Telcphone Co.'s service. Postoffice receipts for year $500.00. Mail daily. Anna Thompson Postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Fruitland you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Fruitland.


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Egypt


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Miles


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Pitney Bottle


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Wellpinit

Population 85 (mostly Indians). A postoffice 45 miles south of Colville, the county seat, and 21 miles southwest of Springdale on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., and 21 miles north of Reardan, on the Washington Central Ry., and connected with both railroad towns by good wagon roads. It is 8 miles northwest of Little Falls and 7 miles north of Chamokane, both on the Spokane river, and from the latter place mail is received twice a week. It contains a blacksmith shop, a Government Indian School employing a teacher and a matron, a Presbyterian church, Rev. W. A. Mackay, resident pastor. NORMAN B O, Postmaster. Pierce S Q, farmer (only listing)

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)


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Blue Creek Camp


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Alyea AKA Wills


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Gerome

Population 33. A postoffice on the Columbia river, first settled in 1903. Contains a Methodist church, saw mill, box factory and general store. Colville is the county seat. Davenport, 30 miles south, is the nearest banking and shipping point.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Gerome you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Gerome.


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Jerusalem


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DeTillion Bridge


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Deer Trail


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Germania


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Fort Spokane


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Pepoon


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Goldstake


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Laurier


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Dulwich


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Orient


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Bossburg

A town on Columbia river, border of Colville Indian Reservation (open to settlers) aod S. F. & N. Ry., 20 milca north of Colville, the county seat, 110 miles north of Spokane and 9 miles north of Marcus, the banking point. Cable ferry to reservation. Ships lumber, lime, ore, fruit and produce. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. connections. Express, G. N. Telegraph, W. U. Mail daily. J. R. Hall, postmaster.
For names of people in Bossburg you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Bossburg with pictures.

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Boyds


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Tie Camp


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Powell


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Napoleon

(Technically in Ferry not Stevens County) A postoffice 7 miles from Marcus, the banking, express, telegraph and shipping point. Mail daily. Kettle River Trading Co, general merchandice.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)


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Evans

A postoffice and station 25 miles northwest of Colville, the county seat and banking point. on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., and on the Columbia river. Long distance telephone. Mail daily.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Evans you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Frontier

Population 5O. A village on Sheep Creek and G. N. Ry., 40 miles north of Colville, the county seat, and 7 miles north of Northport,the banking point. Pacific Telephone & Telegraph connections. Express, Great Northern. Telegraph. Western Union. Mail daily. D. A. Mounce, postmaster.

(Not located on map yet.)


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Godfrey

Population 125. A postoffice first settled in 1904. Located on Kettle river four miles north of Marcus, on the Great Northern Railway, and 18 miles from Colville, the county seat and banking town. Contains large general store, blacksmith shop, saw mill and planing mill, owned and managed by the Enterprise umber Company. (Technically in Ferry County, not Stevens County)

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Godfrey you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Lake City


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Marcus

Populution 400. Is located on the Columbia river, 101 miles north of Spokane, on the Great Northern Railway. The town is most beautifully located and is growing by leaps and bounds. It is the first railway division north of Spokane, and the fine division offices are located here. Almost all kinds of business are to be found inclnding seven general stores, drug store, gents' furnishing store, hardware store, five hotels and lodging houses, livery stable, pool hall, private local telephone exchange, one of the most up-to-date banking institutions in the West, First State Bank, C, W. Barringer, president, a meat market, a live weekly newspaper, The Marcus Messenger, A. T. J Hall, editor and proprietor, and other lines of business.

A water and light plant is now being constructed at a cost of $26,000. Streets are to be graded and cement sidewalks built. A two-tory hospital is now under construction. Monthly payroll of Marcus is now $20,000.

The country adjacent to Marcus is rugged in character, the farming lands lying in plateaux and rolling hills, with a deep, black soil, equaling in fertility and productiveness the famous valley of the Nile. The country is primarily a fruit country, and the products grown in this vicinity are attracting attention wherever exhibited. Vast areas are being set to fruit, and before many years Marcus will be the shipping center of one of the greatest fruit producing districts in the world. The Marcus mining district is fast being developed and at present has several producing mines of great richness. Located within three miles of Marcus is one of the grandest water power sites in the world.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Marcus you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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East Marcus


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Marble

A postoffice and siding on the G. N. Ry. and Columbia river, 10 miles southeast of Northport, the banking, telegraph and express point, 20 miles (air line) north of Colville, the county seat. Mail daily. Pearle L. Conner, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

There are no other names listed for Marble. Follow this link for a short history of Marble with pictures.


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Rockcut


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Ryan, AKA Williams

Population 80. A postoffice and flag station on the G. N. Ry., 25 miles north of Colville, the county seat, 15 miles southwest of Northport, its banking point. It is surrounded by a rich mining country. Express, Great Northern. Long distance telephone connection. Mail daily. Bell,Joseph R, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Ryan you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Waterloo

A postoffice 16 miles (air line) southwest of Colville, the county seat, 19 miles south of Kettle Falls, the banking point, and 22 miles south of Meyers Falls, the shipping point. Inland Tel. Co. Mail semiweekly. Walter A. Park, postmaster.(only name listed)

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)


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Palmer Siding


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Greenwood


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Saint Pauls Mission


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Harter


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North Basin


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Pleasant Valley


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Arzina

A postoffice, 17 1/2 miles southwest of Colville, the county seat, and its nearest banking point, and 20 miles south of Meyers Falls, on the S. F. & N. Ry., its shipping station. It is surrounded by a fine fruit country. Stage daily, with mail, from Harvey. S. E. Shannon, postmaster.

(from the Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Arzina you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Arzina with pictures.


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Rice

Population 60. A postoffice, settled in 1883, on Columbia river, 25 miles southwest of Colville, the county seat, 16 miles west of Meyers Falls, (really 16 miles south of Meyers Falls) its nearest telegraph and express station, and 12 miles south of Kettle Falls its banking point. It is in the center of a rich farming district and exports fruits, grain, lumber, hay and produce. Contains a Presbyterian church and a general store. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co.'s service and Farmers Exchange. Express, Great Northern. Stage daily with mail from Spokane. R. T. Smith, postmaster.

For current pictures from near Rice you can visit the Rice page on the River Routes Tour

(From the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Rice you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Daisy

Population 111. A village on the Kettle Falls and Davenport stage line and the Columbia River. 22 miles southwest of Meyers Falls. Its shipping point on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., 31 miles by road southwest of Colville, the county seat, and i8 miles south of Kettle Falls, its banking point. Fine fruit and stock farms surround the town, which contains a hotel and .general store. Stage line to Meyers Falls and Davenport. Telephone connection. Mail dai1y. Mrs Louise Sackett, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Colville you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a Short history of Daisy.


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Maud

A mining settlement on Stengar creek, first settled in 1887, 30 miles south of Colville, the county seat and banking point and 15 miles southeast of Addy on S. F. & N. brunch of the G. N. Ry., its shipping station. Mining is the principal industry. Stage to Gifford, Dunn and Addy, fare $1.00, $1.50 and $2.OO respectively. Mail tri-weekly.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Maud you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Blue Point


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Swiss Valley


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Summit Valley


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Hungry Hollow


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Gifford

Population 75. A village on the Kettle It'alls and Davenport stage line and the Columbia river, settled in 1889, 20 miles (air line) southwest of ColviUe, the county seat, and 26 miles south of Meyers Falls, on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., its most convenient railroad station, and 24 miles south of Kettle Falls, its banking point. Has telephone connections. Stage to Addy tri-weekly and to Miles daily except Sunday. Mail daily. S. C. Sturman, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Gifford you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory . Short history of Gifford.


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Light


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Inchelium


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Echo

A postoffice on Clugston creek, settled in 1899, 9 miles north of Colville, the county seat, banking point and shipping station, on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., and 94 miles north of Spokane. Contains a saw mill, a graded school employing two teachers and a general store. Stage with mail, daily to Colville. fare 50 cents. Has telephone connection with Colville.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Echo you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Echo.


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Meyers Falls

Population 300. A village on the Colville river and the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., 9 miles from Colville, the county seat, and 3 1/2 miles from Kettle Falls. its nearest banking point. It is surrounded by rich farming and fruit country and numerous mines. Contains a hotel, three general stores, the best of graded schools. organized churches and societies, M. W. A., W. O. W., F. of A., Royal Neighbors, Womcn of Woodcraft. Greenwood Grange, and has a saw mill of 40,000 feet capacity per day, a large planing mill and box factory. There is a new electric light and power plant at the falls costing $100,000, and there are opportunities at Meyers Falls for many factories, such as canning factory, cement factory, starch factory, as well as a number of others, as there is an abundance of power from a fall of 133 feet. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co.'s service and Northern Express Co. Its exports are lumber, wood, vegetables, fruits, produce and live stock. Stage daily to Kettle Falls and Fort Spokane. W. H. Spencer, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Meyers Falls you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .

Follow this link for a short history of Meyers Falls.


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Rickey


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Warren

A postoffice first settled in 1890, on Columbia river, 12 miles south of Meyers Falls, the shipping station, and 8 miles south of Kettle Falls, the nearest banking town. Columbia River Telephone.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Warren you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Harvey

Population 180. a post.office on the Columbia river. settled in 1883, 15 miles southwest of Colville, the county scat. 11 miles south of Kettle Falls, its nearest banking point, and 15 miles southwest of Meyer's Falls. its nearest railroad shipping station on thc S. F, & N. branch of the G. N. Ry. Stage daily to Meyers Falls, fare $1.50. Mail daily. Otto Josefsky, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Harvey you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Dunn

Population 10. A post.office also known as Summit Valley, first settled in 1889, 80 miles north of Spokane. 24 miles southeast of Colville, the couuty seat and banking point, and 10 miles from Addy, on thc S. F. & N. Ry., its nearest shipping location. Pearson Angust, postmaster and general store.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

Follow this link for a short history of Dunn.


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Schmidt

Also spelled: SCHMID.

Population 10. A village on Smith creek, settled in 1883, 13 miles southwest of Addy, 11 miles southwest of Blue Creek, the shipping station, and 18 miles west of Chewelah, the banking town. Stage semi-weekly to Blue Creek. Telephone conneetion with Blue Creek and Addy. Schmid Frank B, postmaster, Shattuck, T.N, Dentist

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)


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Spencer


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Old Kettle Falls

Population 600. A prosperous town in 8 beautiful fruit valley at the junction of the Colville and Columbia rivers. It is three and one-half miles from Meyers Falls and five and one-half miles from Marcus, both on the S. F. & N. R. R., and has stage connections with Meyers Falls, Harvey, Daisy, Gifford, Hunters and Fort Miles. One thousand horse power is developed close by on the Colville river, and the falls of the Columbia river, from which the town gets its name, are capable of developing two hundred thousand horse power. Jt is incorporated as a town of the fourth class. It has two banks, fine business houses, two hotels and a brick yard. It has four church organizations, the Presbyterian, Baptist, Episcopal and Methodist; also good schools. The fraternal and benevolent societies are represented by the Masons, Eastern Star, I. O. O. F., Rebekahs, W. O. W., M. W. A., Grand Army, Woman's Relief Corps. It has one newspaper, The Scimitar. Has a first class gravity water system, and also electric lights and power. Has mail delivery twice a day. Both long distance and rural telephoncs. Both sides of the Columbia river adjoining the town to the south are adapted to the raising of the finest fruits, especially the commercial winter apple. There is an irrigation systcm on each side of the river covering about twelve thousand acres of choice fruit lands. There is a well organized Fruit Growers Union, and the valley has several good Grange organizations.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Old Kettle Falls you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Kettle Falls.


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Goodwin AKL Ward, St Regis Mis

(Called Ward in 1911) Population 150. A postoffice and flag station formerly called Goodwin, the station name of which is Mission, on the G. N. Ry. It is 7 miles northwest of Colville, the county seat, 6 miles northeast of Kettle Falls, its nearest banking point, and 3 miles southeast of Meyers Falls its nearest express, telegraph and shipping point. A Catholic Mission is sustained. Exports are hay, grain and fruit.. Telephone connections. A. Fletcher, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Ward you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory 2011 Part 2.


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Ward (see also Goodwin)

The Ward in the 1911 Polk Directory refers to Goodwin east of Kettle Falls.

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Chewelah

Chewelah is located on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., 65 miles north of Spokane in the heart of one of the most productive valleys in the state oŁ Washington and geographically in the center of Stevens county. It has a population of about 1500 inhabitants. has five well patronized church organizations, viz.: Roman Catholic, Methodist Episcopal, Congregational, Free Methodist and Christian, and is uusurpassed in the county for public school facilities, employing a corps of eleven teachers, besides a Catholic Parochial school employing two teachers. A union high school building has just been erected at a cost of $25,000. We have at present, one three-story brick hotel of which the owners are very proud, and which the traveling public pronounce as one of the best and most up-to-date in the state.
The resources of Stevens county are varied in kind and quantity. The foothills and mountains on either side of the vallcy are covered with a luxurious growth of merchantable timber, an unlimited amount of grazing land of the bunch grass variety, which for fattening quality is unexcelled. Statistics might be given which would show that the population of Stevens county has more than doubled in the past six years; that the taxable valuation has quadrupled in the past five years; that real estate values have doubled in the past three years. The three great industries of the county in their order are, farming, mining and lumbering. Agriculture will always be as it is today, the principal industry. Fruit raising, stock raising and diversified farming are all practiced here, while in the valley are found many large farms devoted exclusively to the raising of timothy hay. Lumbering is an important industry in many ways-it enables the farmer to clear his land by giving a market for his standing timber, furnishes him employment at high wages during the winter months aud creates a steady demand for all the hay, grain and other products of the farm.
(from the Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Chewelah you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Chewelah with pictures.


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Bingville


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Three Forks


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Colville

No better idea of the prosperity of the country can be obtained than by a visit to Colville, the county seat of Stevens County. It isone of the best towns in the northwest, practically the gateway to British Columbia and the mining towns of thc north. It is a city of magnificent promise. It gives evidence of progressive and strenuous life. It is conceded to be the most beautiful townsite in the northwest. It has wide streets, fine natural parks, and running streams of water, 140-pound pressure water system, a new $35,000 high school building, public school building, primary school building, $12,000 Masonic temple, 4 lodge organizations, nine churches. Colville Valley Grange, fire department. The Colville Chamber of Commerce is a live organizlltion, the board of control holding weekly meetings. The city is well equipped with free city postal delivery, fine modern three-story hotels, an up-to-date hospital, two weekly newspapers,flouring mill, creamery, brick yard and cement block lactory, $25,000 planing mill and dry kiln, electric light plant, sewer system, three department stores, one of which is a farmers' co-operative concern. During the year 1910 building improvements within the city amounted to $150,000, and at least an equal amount will be expended in each succeeding year. The population ia about 2600. Close to Colville are the orchards of the Colville and the Arden Orchard companies, where 20,000 apple trees are just coming into bearing. In all directions from Colville, smaller orchards are being planted, and those which are now bearing are bringing in fine incomes. The Colville Valley has been dredged, reclaiming many acres of the richest land in the nortbwest.
(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Colville you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Addy

A postoffice on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., in the central part of the county, on the Colville river, 14 miles South of Colville, the county seat, and 9 miles north of Chewelah, its nearest banking town and telegraph station. Contains a Methodist church, two saw mills, four general stores, two hotels and several other places of business. Exports lumber, wood, hay and produce. Several mines are located near by. Stage to Gifford and Meteor three times a week. Express, Great Northern. Telegraph, Western Union. Mail daily. (from the Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Addy you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Addy with pictures.


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Wessendorf


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Lost Valley


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Wrights Valley


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Arden

Population 50. A postoffice on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., and Little Pend d'Oreille river, 7 miles south of Colville, the county seat and banking station. Arden Lumber Co, saw mill and gencral store Arden Mercantilc Co, general store. Farquhar Alexander, postmaster.

For names of people in Addy you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Arden with pictures.


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Park Rapids


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Middleport


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Old Colville


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Millville

A postoffice 5 miles from Colville, the county seat, banking, express, telegraph and shipping point. Mail daily.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

The only name listed is Mrs A Duffy, grocer.


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Fort Colville


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Crystal Falls

A postoffice located on the Little Pend d'Orelle, about 1OO miles from Spokane and 15 miles cast or Colville, the ounty seat, banking and shipping point. Contains two stores. C S Motheral, postmaster.


(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)


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Orin

Population 100. A village and station on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry. and the Colville river, four miles from ColvilIe, the county seat. banking, express and telegraph point. Sustains a Methodist church and has a saw mill. Telephone connections. C. T. Winslow postmaster. Winslow Lumber Co, saw mill is the only listed item.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

Follow this link for a short history of Orin with pictures.


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Blue Creek

Population 71. A town on the S. F. & N. Ry. and Colville river, 70 miles north of Spokane, 17 south of Colville, the county seat, 6 miles west of Chewelah, the banking point. Ships lumber and produce. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. connections. Stage to Schmid semiweekly. C. G. Dannison, polltmll8ter.
(from the Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Blue you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Blue Creek with pictures.


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Waits

A postoffice, 56 miles north of Spokane, 4 miles west of Valley, the shipping station, and 10 miles southwest of Chewelah, the banking town. Farmers Telephone Co's service. Mail to Valley, daily Smith Wm 0, postmaster. Woodbury & Boucher, saw mill.(only name listed)

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)


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Pinkney City


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Kane

Population 35. First settled in 1906. A village and postoffice on the Columbia river and S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., 4 miles southwest of Northport, the banking point. Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co.'s service.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Kane you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Velvet


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Fivemile


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Spirit


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Paradise Valley


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Smackout Camp


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Divine Place


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Peterson Clearing


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Paff Clearing


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Boundary

Population 20. A postoffice and village on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., in the northern part of the county, on Canadian boundary and the Columbia river. First settled in 1892, 142 miles north of Spokane, 52 north of Colville, the county seat, and 10 miles northeast of Northport, the banking point. It is the distributing and shipping point for the Fish Creek and Red Top mines. Express, Great Northern. Telegraph, Great Northern. Mail daily.
(from the Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Boundary you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Boundary with pictures.


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Cummins, AKA Leadpoint


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Northport

Population 400. A flourishing town on the Columbia river, 130 miles north of Spokane, is the terminal point of three railways-the N. & F. N. S., C. & R. M. and S. P. & N. First settled in 1892 and incorporated as a city in 1898. It is governed by a mayor and city council. It is a port of entry, and the United States customs officers are located here. It is situated in a mountainous country. full of mineral deposits and valuable mines. Fruit farming is one of the principal industries. It contains a smelter and refining works, creamery, lime kiln, Catholic, Episcopal and Presbyterian churches, Masonic, Odd Fellows, W. O. W., F. O. E. and A. O. U. W. lodges,good schools, natural water system, the water coming from springs and mountain streams; electric light and power plant, brick yard, saw mill, a bank, two weekly newspapers, Republican and News, numerous general stores, and a ferry to Indian Reservation. Exports metal, wood, hay, fruit, lumber, brick, lime and ice.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

Follow this link for a short history of Northport with pictures.


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Stones Spur


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Little Dalles


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Aladdin

A new postoffice located 110 miles north of Spokane and 21 miles northeast of Colville, the county seat, and nearest banking, express and shipping station. Contains one general store and public hall. Stage connections with Colville. Mail tri.weekly. John Kendall, postmaster.

(from the Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Aladdin you can download the Adobe PDF file of the first part of the Polk Directory . Follow this link for a short history of Aladdin with pictures.


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Cronin

A town on Deep Creek, 19 miles northeast of Colville, the county seat, shipping aod banking point. Stage to Colville tri-weekly.
(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Cronin you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .


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Carrs Corner


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Little Sweden


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Cline


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Gray

A postoffice and station. first settled in 1900, on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., and 35 miles southeast of Colville, the county seat, and 52 miles (by rail) northwest of Spokane, the usual banking point. Contains a general store and a saw mill. Mail daily. W. S. Rose, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Gray you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory .Follow this link for a short history of Gray with pictures.


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Empey Sch.


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Silver Point


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Ford

Follow this link for a short history of Ford.

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Tumtum

A village on Spokane river 60 miles south of Colville, the county seat, 25 miles north of Spokane, 15 south of Springdale, the shipping point, and 15 west of Deer Park, the banking point. Tri-weekly mail stage to Springdale.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Tumtum you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory 2011 Part 2.


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Denison


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Deer Park


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Wayside


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Clayton


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Loon Lake

Population 300. Is 38 miles north of Spokane, the usual banking point. It is situated in the southern part of the county. Contains two general stores, two hotels, one livery stable, one racket store, two feed stores, one blacksmith shop, a weekly newspaper, The Loon Lake Times and three saw mills as well as numerous mines in the vicinity. Loon Lake is one of the finest summer resorts in the state. It. is situated on the banks of the lake from which it takes its name. The Kemp, Komah copper mine, one of the richest copper mines in the state, is in the vicinity of the town, also within five miles of the town has recently been discovered what is claimed by experts from all over the country as well as from Germany to be the largest and richest tungsten field in the world. The Loon Lake Irrigation Company is watering 2500 acres of fine orchard land adjoining the town. Exports are lumber, mineral. ice. produce and fruit. Telephone, Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Co. Telegraph, Great Northern. Express, Great Northern. Mail daily. Mrs. A. M. Morris, postmaster.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Loon Lake you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory 2011 Part 2.

Follow this link for a short history of Loon Lake.


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Keystone Corners


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Fort Carlson


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Valley

Population 400. First settled in 1888. A village on the Colville river and the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry., 31 miles from Colville, the county seat, 58 miles from Spokane, 9 miles south of Chewelah, its nearest banking point. Mines of gold and silver are in the vicinity and 10 miles west are located the famous marble and green onyx mines which arc worked quite extensively. Contains Methodist church, good school, a first class hotel, several stores doing a splendid business. The Kulzer Electric Light system is 2 miles south with a 250-horse power; has two saw mills within a few miles of the town. A mill for manufacturing mineral paint is now completed, all tending to make Valley quite a shipping point. Exports are marble, onyx, hay, grain, wood, lumber, and produce. Has long distance and rural telephone lines. Express, Great Northern. For any additional information address J G Hare, manager Valley Land Co.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Valley you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory 2011 Part 2.


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Dehlbone


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Loon Lake Park


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Granite Point


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Walkers Prarie


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Springdale

Population 450. Situated in the southern part of Stevens County, on Sheep creek, and on the S. F. & N. branch of the G. N. Ry. The Town of Springdale, which was formerly known as Squire City, was founded with the advent of the S. F. & N. road, built by D. C. Corbin in 1890. The town was incorporated under the name of Springdale in the year 1903, and is governed by a mayor and common council of five members. It is the nearcst railroad point and the outlet for all the rich mines of the Deer Trail and Cedar Canyon mining districts, located 20 miles west of the town, and from which much rich ore is shipped to the Outside smelters every year. Springdale annually markets hundreds of tons of the finest timothy hay. The timber resources are also enormous, and as this land is logged off, it is being found to he peculiarly well adapted to fruit raising and gardening. Almost adjoining the town on the north is located a vast deposit of lime rock, owned by the Washington Brick, Lime & Sewer Pipe Co., of Spokane, who have a large quarry and refining plant located upon the railroad one-half mile northeast of town. Springdale is the junction point of the Springdale & Long Lake Ry., with the Great Northern, and is the supply point for the big power plant of the Washington Water Power Co. now being erected at Long Lake, 22 miles south.

On July 9, 1908, the entire business portion of the place was destroyed by fire, leaving the town without a single business concern to supply the immediate Wants of the people. Notwithstanding this great loss and the natural setback it gave the town, Springdale is today rebuilt throughout with modern brick and other fire proof structures. Springdale is located 40 miles almost due north of the city of Spokane, and a equal distance almost due south from Colville, the county seat of Stevens county. It supports two church organizations, Congregational and Church of God, the former owning its own house of worship, and maintains a fine public school. A system of water works is also maintained, and a volunteer fire department looks after the safety of the town from that standpoint, assisted by a modern and up-to-date chemical fire engine of the latest pattern. The town has three big general stores, carrying stocks ranging in quantity from $15,000 to $50,000, a bank, a live weekly paper, the Springdale Reformer, two large sawmills nearby, two liveries, two hotels, two restaurants, three saloons, one drug store, one harnass store, one meat market, one confectionary, one barber shop, one doctor, and various othcr lines of business. The citizens of the town are wide awake and enterprising, and always extend a cordial welcome to strangers who may come here looking for a home on some of the cheap land which is so abundant in this vicinity.

(from the 1911 Polk Directory on the archive site.)

For names of people in Springdale you can download the Adobe PDF file of the second part of the Polk Directory 2011 Part 2.


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Thetis AKA Siwash


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Squire City


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Spokane House


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